for when you look up the etymology of a word or idiom

Probably what *this* should be called.
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the_zoomies
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Re: for when you look up the etymology of a word or idiom

Post by the_zoomies » Sat May 01, 2021 12:40 am

Skeletor wrote:
Thu Apr 22, 2021 9:53 pm
The overlap betwen male and female doesn't come from their origins, they just eventually converged on similar spelling

female (n.)
early 14c., from Old French femelle "woman, female" (12c.), from Medieval Latin femella "a female," from Latin femella "young female, girl," diminutive of femina "woman, a female" ("woman, female," literally "she who suckles," from PIE root *dhe(i)- "to suck").

male (n.)
late 14c., "male human being; male fish or land animal; one of the sex (securities fraud) (securities fraud) that begets young," from Old French masle (adj.) "masculine, male, adult," also used as a noun (12c., Modern French mâle), from Latin masculus "masculine, male, worthy of a man" (source also of Provençal mascle, Spanish macho, Italian maschio), diminutive of mas (genitive maris) "male person or animal, male."
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